Sustainable Use and Conservation of Biodiversity

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I NTERSPECIFIC POLLINATOR MOVEMENTS REDUCE POLLEN DEPOSITION AND SEED PRODUCTION IN MIMULUS RINGENS
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Online database/library
2009
Abstract: 

 Movement of pollinators between cofl owering plant species may infl uence conspecifi c pollen deposition and seed set. Interspe- cifi c pollinator movements between native and showy invasive plants may be particularly detrimental to the pollination and repro- ductive success of native species. We explored the effects of invasive  Lythrum salicaria  on the reproductive success of  Mimulus ringens , a wetland plant native to eastern North America. Pollinator fl ights between these species signifi cantly reduced the amount of conspecifi c pollen deposited on  Mimulus  stigmas and the number of seeds in  Mimulus  fruits, suggesting that pollen loss is an important mechanism of competition for pollination. Although pollen loss is often attributed to pollen wastage on heterospecifi c fl oral structures, our novel fi ndings suggest that grooming by bees as they forage on a competitor may also signifi cantly reduce outcross pollen export and seed set in  Mimulus ringens . 
  

Document language: 
English
Authors: 
Rebecca J. Flanagan, Randall J. Mitchell, Dustin Knutowski, and Jeffrey D. Karron
Thematic area: 
Sustainable Use and Conservation of Biodiversity

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